#SpeciesQuest

Species Count: 253
Last Updated: May 20, 2019

The Pecos Pupfish, Species #183, is one of my favorite catches because I’m likely one of the only people on Earth to ever catch it on hook-and-line — maybe THE only one. Plus, I did all of the research, exploration, and bleeding all by myself. Like a big boy.

The world of Species Hunting goes by many names: Species Hunting, Species Fishing, Lifelist Fishing, Lifelisting, etc., but I call it my #SpeciesQuest.

Growing up, I fished for trout more than everything else combined. Trout fishing is closed during the winter across most of my native Oregon, so I didn’t fish year-round.

Over time, I began broadening my horizons and chasing other species as the enjoyment of fishing became a passion and the passion became an obsession.

Eventually, the temperate climate I lived in and my love for the Pokémon games and their message “Gotta catch ’em all” message made me a Species Hunter before I knew it.

Species Hunting

Though I grew up loving to fish for anything and everything that swims, I didn’t honestly consider myself a “species hunter” until the fall of 2017.

It was this time when I finally decided to count how many species I’d actually caught: a whopping 105. Not bad, considering there are only 82 species officially confirmed in Oregon but also not good, considering there is an angler named Steve Wozniak (no, not the Apple co-founder) who is fast-approaching 2,000.

Steve Wozniak probably wasn’t the first species hunter, but he was the first to do it so well that it brought mainstream attention to this segment of the angling world, hitting 1,000 fish species in July of 2010 and earning renown in the process.

I happened to “meet” Steve via email in 2016 and then actually got to fish with him in 2018. We’ve since stayed in contact and fished several more times, and I’ve been able to help contribute in some small way to his own, #SpeciesQuest that has become the standard.

Steve has been a mentor and friend who has helped me find my way not only to new fish species but to fellow Species Hunters who have also helped me in my journey, including Ben Cantrell and Josh Leisen (each at 500+ species), Kenneth Tse (800+ species), and the mysterious Eli (1,100+ species).

Tenets

Like any good cult, Species Hunting has evolved its own set of rules, established by the community that partakes in the sport, with precedence given to those individuals who have found the most success.

They are as follows:

1. Every species has value. There are no “trash fish.” Every fish has worth if only for that first-time catch, called a “lifer” by most.

2. Science matters. Species hunters generally tend to value the science of fishing, of knowing what species reside where and how those species fit into the larger ecosystem. This inquisitive nature tends to make species hunters better anglers overall. If you know what little fish the trout and bass are feeding on, you can target them more effectively, right?

3. Species hunters don’t eat their young. The species hunting community is as tightly knit as any other angling community. As a trout angler, I’m unlikely to give you GPS coordinates of where I caught my latest 28-incher. As a species hunter, I’ll tell you exactly where I was standing when I caught that species you’re currently chasing — most of the time. I even track this in a Fishing Map. Learn how to build your own by clicking here.

4. Species hunters are social. There are a number of social constructs out there, and I’m part of Facebook groups, online communities such as specieshunters.com or roughfish.com, and there are always Instagram chats.

5. Be honest. Most species hunters only count fish they legally hooked in the mouth on hook and line. Others allow snagging fish where legal. Still others might include catching fish by hand, spearing or shooting them or even using a net. However you caught a fish, the community encourages you to be clear how you caught it and to never lie — even if the sport of fishing, as a whole, is one that tends toward exaggeration.

Follow these rules, and you will be welcomed into #SpeciesHunting and my #SpeciesQuest with open arms just as I have been.

Start following my #SpeciesQuest from the beginning or, choose from the list below. A (WR) indicates I currently hold the IGFA All-Tackle World Record for the species:

Species #1-10
(Oregon)

Species #1 — Rainbow Trout
Species #2 — Brook Trout
Species #3 — Bull Trout
Species #4 — Bluegill
Species #5 — Yellow Perch
Species #6 — Largemouth Bass
Species #7 — Brown Trout
Species #8 — Black Crappie
Species #9 — Black Rockfish
Species #10 — Blue Rockfish

Species #11-20
(California, Oregon)

Species #11 — Lingcod
Species #12 — Pumpkinseed
Species #13 — Smallmouth Bass
Species #14 — Green Sunfish
Species #15 — Kokanee
Species #16 — White Crappie
Species #17 — Tui Chub
Species #18 — White Croaker
Species #19 — Pacific Chub Mackerel
Species #20 — Calico/Kelp Bass

Species #21-30
(California, Oregon)
Species #21 — Walleye Surfperch
Species #22 — Northern Pikeminnow
Species #23 — Brown Bullhead
Species #24 — Redtail Surfperch
Species #25 — Speckled Sanddab
Species #26 — Yellowtail Rockfish
Species #27 — Brown Rockfish
Species #28 — Northern Anchovy
Species #29 — Pacific Sardine
Species #30 — Kelp Greenling

Species #31-40
(Oregon)

Species #31 — Pacific Staghorn Sculpin
Species #32 — Cabezon
Species #33 — Sacramento Perch
Species #34 — Cutthroat Trout
Species #35 — Buffalo Sculpin (WR)
Species #36 — Canary Rockfish
Species #37 — Calico Surfperch
Species #38 — Red Irish Lord
Species #39 — Deacon Rockfish
Species #40 — Striped Seaperch

Species #41-50
(California, Oregon, Washington)

Species #41 — Klamath River Lamprey
Species #42 — Grass Rockfish
Species #43 — Brown Smoothhound
Species #44 — Bat Ray
Species #45 — Spiny Dogfish
Species #46 — Leopard Shark
Species #47 — Striped Bass
Species #48 — California Halibut
Species #49 — Coho Salmon
Species #50 — Chinook Salmon

Species #51-60
(New Zealand)

Species #51 — Australasian Snapper
Species #52 — Jack Mackerel
Species #53 — European Perch
Species #54 — Common Rudd
Species #55 — Blue Cod
Species #56 — Estuarine Triplefin
Species #57 — Northern Kahawai
Species #58 — Shortfin Eel
Species #59 — Yelloweye Mullet
Species #60 — Kahawai

Species #61-70
(Oregon, Virginia, D.C.)

Species #61 — Widow Rockfish
Species #62 — White Sturgeon
Species #63 — Fathead Minnow
Species #64 — Bluehead Chub
Species #65 — Fallfish
Species #66 — White Catfish
Species #67 — Warmouth
Species #68 — White Perch
Species #69 — Brown Irish Lord
Species #70 — Common Carp

Species #71-80
(California, Oregon, Portugal, Spain)

Species #71 — Slender Sculpin
Species #72 — Spotted Bass
Species #73 — Copper Rockfish
Species #74 — Redear Sunfish
Species #75 — Yellow Bullhead
Species #76 — Goldfish
Species #77 — Blue Chub
Species #78 — Thicklip Gray Mullet
Species #79 — Striped Mullet
Species #80 — Klamath Largescale Sucker (WR)

Species #81-90
(Alabama, Oregon, Utah)

Species #81 — Whitespotted Greenling
Species #82 — Monkeyface Prickleback
Species #83 — Lost River Sucker
Species #84 — American Shad
Species #85 — Shiner Perch
Species #86 — White Bass
Species #87 — Channel Catfish
Species #88 — Walleye
Species #89 — Spotted Gar
Species #90 — Shortnose Gar

Species #91-100
(Florida, Tennessee)

Species #91 — Creek Chub
Species #92 — Spotted Sunfish
Species #93 — Pinfish
Species #94 — Mangrove Snapper
Species #95 — Red Drum
Species #96 — Hardhead Catfish
Species #97 — Atlantic Croaker
Species #98 — Frillfin Goby
Species #99 — Pigfish
Species #100 — Gaftopsail Catfish

Species #101-110
(Arizona, Florida, Tennessee)

Species #101 — Pacific Bonito
Species #102 — Opaleye
Species #103 — Salema
Species #104 — Largemouth Blenny
Species #105 — Garibaldi
Species #106 — Chum Salmon
Species #107 — Rio Grande Cichlid
Species #108 — Redbelly Tilapia
Species #109 — Blue Tilapia
Species #110 — Nile Tilapia

Species #111-120
(Arizona, Oregon)

Species #111 — Grass Carp
Species #112 — Yellow Bass
Species #113 — Lake Trout
Species #114 — Reticulate Sculpin
Species #115 — Prickly Sculpin
Species #116 — Torrent Sculpin
Species #117 — Chiselmouth
Species #118 — Tidepool Sculpin
Species #119 — Shortnose Sucker
Species #120 — Pacific Herring

Species #121-130
(Georgia, Oregon)

Species #121 — Padded Sculpin
Species #122 — Klamath Marbled Sculpin
Species #123 — Klamath Lake Sculpin
Species #124 — Speckled Dace
Species #125 — Dixie Chub
Species #126 — Redside Shiner
Species #127 — Rosylip Sculpin
Species #128 — Fluffy Sculpin
Species #129 — Smoothhead Sculpin
Species #130 — Mountain Whitefish

Species #131-140
(Florida, Oregon)

Species #131 — Umpqua Pikeminnow
Species #132 — Vermiculated Sailfin Catfish
Species #133 — Eastern Mosquitofish
Species #134 — Florida Bass
Species #135 — Florida Gar
Species #136 — Dollar Sunfish
Species #137 — Seminole Killifish
Species #138 — Redbreast Sunfish
Species #139 — Coastal Shiner
Species #140 — Black Acara

Species #141-150
(Florida)
Species #141 — Jack Dempsey Cichlid
Species #142 — Dimerus Cichlid
Species #143 — Bowfin
Species #144 — Ladyfish
Species #145 — Common Snook
Species #146 — Atlantic Tarpon
Species #147 — Atlantic Spadefish
Species #148 — Longnose Gar
Species #149 — Walking Catfish
Species #150 — Golden Shiner

Species #151-160
(Canada, Florida, New York)
Species #151 — Golden Topminnow
Species #152 — White Grunt
Species #153 — Spottail Pinfish
Species #154 — Scrawled Cowfish
Species #155 — Black Sea Bass
Species #156 — Atlantic Kingfish
Species #157 — Round Goby
Species #158 — Shorthead Redhorse
Species #159 — Freshwater Drum
Species #160 — Rock Bass

Species #161-170
(California, New York)
Species #161 — Emerald Shiner
Species #162 — Rainbow Darter
Species #163 — Sacramento Pikeminnow
Species #164 — Hardhead (Pending WR)
Species #165 — Western Mosquitofish
Species #166 — Cortez Bonefish
Species #167 — Spotted Sand Bass
Species #168 — Round Stingray
Species #169 — Shovelnose Guitarfish
Species #170 — Barred Sand Bass

Species #171-180
(California)
Species #171 — Bay Blenny
Species #172 — California Scorpionfish
Species #173 — California Grunion
Species #174 — Rock Wrasse
Species #175 — Diamond Turbot
Species #176 — Spotfin Croaker
Species #177 — Yellowfin Croaker
Species #178 — Threespine Stickleback
Species #179 — Desert Pupfish
Species #180 — Porthole Livebearer

Species #181-190
(Arizona, New Mexico, Texas)
Species #181 — Longfin Dace
Species #182 — Longnose Dace
Species #183 — Red Shiner
Species #184 — Pecos Pupfish
Species #185 — Inland Silverside
Species #186 — Longear Sunfish
Species #187 — Guadalupe Bass
Species #188 — Mexican Tetra
Species #189 — Variegated Platy
Species #190 — Redspotted Sunfish

Species #191-200
(New Mexico, Texas)
Species #191 — Texas Shiner
Species #192 — Blacktail Shiner
Species #193 — Guadalupe Roundnose Minnow
Species #194 — Molly Miller Blenny
Species #195 — Dog Snapper
Species #196 — Bay Anchovy
Species #197 — Spanish Mackerel
Species #198 — Speckled Trout
Species #199 — Jack Crevalle
Species #200 — Hairy Blenny

Species #201-210
(California, Oregon, Utah, Texas)
Species #201 — Longnose Killifish
Species #202 — Sheepshead Minnow
Species #203 — El Rito Roundnose Minnow
Species #204 — Brassy Minnow
Species #205 — Black Bullhead
Species #206 — Banded Killifish
Species #207 — Coastrange Sculpin
Species #208 — Riffle Sculpin
Species #209 — Wooly Sculpin
Species #210 — Ocean Whitefish

Species #211-220
(California, Croatia, Slovenia)
Species #211 — Pacific Sanddab
Species #212 — Treefish
Species #213 — Honeycomb Rockfish
Species #214 — California Lizardfish
Species #215 — Rocky Goby
Species #216 — Black Goby
Species #217 — Sarato’s Goby
Species #218 — Big-Scale Sand Smelt
Species #219 — Five-Spotted Wrasse
Species #220 — Sand Smelt

Species #221-230
(Croatia)
Species #221 — Greater Weever
Species #222 — Brown Comber
Species #223 — Smallspotted Catshark
Species #224 — Tub Gurnard
Species #225 — Annular Seabream
Species #226 — Red Porgy
Species #227 — Giant Goby
Species #228 — Roule’s Goby
Species #229 — Black Scorpionfish
Species #230 — Red-Mouthed Goby

Species #231-240
(Czechia, Florida, Oregon)

Species #231 — European Chub
Species #232 — Rock Greenling
Species #233 — High Cockscomb
Species #234 — Columbia Sculpin
Species #235 — Largescale Sucker
Species #236 — Peamouth Chub
Species #237 — Shorthead Sculpin
Species #238 — Tyee Redside Shiner
Species #239 — Flagfish
Species #240 — Convict Cichlid

Species #241-250
(Florida)
Species #241 — Westfall’s Darter
Species #242 — Metallic Shiner
Species #243 — Tidewater Mojarra
Species #244 — Spotfin Croaker
Species #245 — Crested Goby
Species #246 — Mayan Cichlid
Species #247 — Blackchin Tilapia
Species #248 — Fat Sleeper Goby
Species #249 — Bluefin Killifish
Species #250 — Rainwater Killifish

Species #251-253
(Florida)
Species #251 — Lined Topminnow
Species #252 — Scaled Sardine
Species #253 — Sheepshead

Follow CaughtOvgard

#CaughtOvgard


Shopping Cart

Follow

Click here to be informed every time a new post is written.

Join 3,027 other subscribers