Species #30 — Kelp Greenling

Species #30 — Kelp Greenling

Hicks call them “Lingcod Candy Bars,” but the Kelp Greenling is a good failsafe against being skunked when fishing from shore.

Species: Kelp Greenling (Hexagrammos decagrammus)
Location: Chetco River South Jetty, Brookings-Harbor Marina, OR
Date: September 10, 2009

Rashomon Effect 5-of-6: My Feet

Danner Vanish. I still remember them because they were both the most expensive non-wading boots I’ve ever purchased and some of the most comfortable shoes I’ve ever worn fishing.

They certainly weren’t stylish, but they felt great. After spending all day on my feet, landing fish after fish and adding nearly half a dozen new species to my Life List, puking my guts out, and then walking all over the marina chasing bait, I should’ve had aching feet. But I didn’t.

I felt great.

***

So when Ben and I loaded up a bag of bait, we decided to take to Round 3 of our glorious day of fishing.

We headed to the jetty.

***

The sand squished under my feet as I made my way from the car to the massive boulders that comprised the jetty.

I didn’t like it.

Once my boots found purchase on the rock, I nearly lost my footing as one of the many “Jetty Cats” that we loved to joke about darted into the shadows.

Hopping from boulder to boulder probably didn’t require the level of bravado I put into each leap, but I trusted them, and it gave me a bit of rush knowing that one slip could spell disaster. The thrill was titillating.

Making our way to the water wasn’t easy, what with the slick rocks, creeping tide, and fog creeping in slowly, obscuring our view. Still, we managed to get down to the the large flat rock at the end of the structure and catch a few fish.

Ben got the first few fish and then I hooked one. It was a Kelp Greenling. My fifth new species of the day brought to me by the great folks at Danner. The problems of that day aside, those Danner hiking boots are still my favorite boots ever.

Only one left.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #31 — Pacific Staghorn Sculpin.


Species #20 — Calico/Kelp Bass

The mainstay of Southern California charter fishing is the Calico or Kelp Bass.

Species: Calico/Kelp Bass (Paralabrax clathratus)
Location: Huntington Beach Coastline, CA
Date: June 12, 2008

I wrote a detailed account on how and when I caught my first Calico/Kelp Bass as part of my How I Got Hooked series.

From How I Got Hooked — The Third Lesson (Part 2/2): Determination.

“The Charter

One day of the trip included a charter fishing excursion, which I had looked forward to for years.

In fact, I’d led the class fundraising efforts throughout high school, starting a concession stand for junior high sporting events, then, seeing its success and noting that hot lunch was only served at our school three Fridays a month, starting a snack bar that served microwavable lunches and snack items once a week. It did quite well.

As our funds grew, we rolled into senior year. One of my best friends, Tony Maddalena, and I, had been given three pages of yearbook ads to sell. We sold about three times that many.

All told, our efforts had resulted in more than $12,000 that we could put towards the trip, but all I cared about was what would become my first-ever chartered fishing trip.

The opportunity to choose a half-day or full-day trip day came, and everybody wanted to do a half-day trip. I was crushed. One of the chaperones, Dan Phelps, either took pity on me or really wanted to go fishing, because he volunteered to accompany me on the full-day trip.

The barracuda had been running, and the last three boats before us had caught hundreds of them, so I was optimistic. Perhaps too optimistic, because our boat caught less than a dozen between the 50-plus anglers on board.

I had a five-footer strike my anchovy right as I brought it to the surface, slurping the soft-bodied bait right off of my hook.

I stood there, momentarily frozen, before the shock and disappointment set in.

Sure, we caught lots of Pacific Chub Mackerel, Calico Bass, and Dan even got a brilliantly-colored, red-orange California Scorpionfish — which we were told had dorsal spines as poisonous as its flesh was delicious — but no barracuda.

On my first-ever charter fishing trip in 2008, I caught and released 8 Pacific Mackerel and kept 5 Calico Bass.

On my first-ever charter fishing trip in 2008, I caught and released eight Pacific Mackerel and kept five Calico Bass.

Returning to the house, we learned the guys on the half-day trip had caught almost a dozen species between them, including barracuda, yellowtail, and even a four-foot shark.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #21 — Walleye Surfperch.


Species #11 — Lingcod

I’ve yet to catch a Lingcod over 20 pounds, but I get closer every year.

Species: Lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus)
Location: Brookings Coastline, OR
Date: May 26, 2005

It had started the day before. My first time on the ocean, I rode out in a small Bayliner in the afternoon. The handful of students and three chaperones who decided to brave the afternoon waves thought it would be worth it.

The newness of the experience alone would have made it worth it to me, but after watching half a dozen Black Rockfish find their way into our boat, Perry Fields, one of our chaperones, hooked into something that seemed a little bigger.

He battled the beast for awhile.

Then his rod doubled over.

If it was fighting hard before, it was now a creature possessed. His rod bobbed and bounced, and I asked if it would break. Everyone had stopped fishing now. We watched in awe as what could be nothing other than a sea monster slowly rose in the water column and made its way closer to us.

In a moment frozen in time, we saw it. Maybe 10 feet below the boat in relatively clear water, was a fish that looked positively demonic. At first, I thought it had two heads, or maybe a head shaped like a Hammerhead Shark, but it was just a large fish clamped horizontally onto a smaller fish.

It was a Lingcod. The Lingcod.

The smaller fish was maybe 16-18 inches in length, but the fish that had attempted to eat it was easily twice that length, maybe more.

As our teacher, Mr. Dean, went to gaff it, its jaws released the poor, hapless smaller fish, and this beast stuck momentarily in the water column maybe four feet below the boat.

“Grab me,” Mr. Dean commanded, and Mr. Wehr, our other chaperone, steadied him as he plunged the gaff over the gunwale and bent impossibly far over the boat. His body flexed, and he arched backward, the massive, writing beast hanging from the end of the three-foot gaff.

Leviathan itself railed about on the floor of the boat, actively trying to bite any- and everything it could like a cobra in its death throes. It connected with the edge of a boot, unable to sink its sinister teeth into the hard leather.

Acting quickly, Mr. Wehr cut its gills and the beast decided not to go down without a fight. It sprayed warm, frothy blood all over. My new jeans caught a globule of the deathly-dark blood and stained them.

When we got it back to shore, we were saddened to find ourselves without a scale large enough to weigh it, but it measured 45 inches in length. As teenage boys do, we dared each other to place our heads inside its massive jaws. Mine fit with room to spare.

I shuddered.

We filleted the beast out before I remember getting any pictures. The carcass was tossed into the garbage, but I asked if I could cut the cheeks out, since I’d read they were quite good. They agreed.

My grandfather’s butchery skills did not pass to me, and as I awkwardly dug out the almost-priceless meat with my old Rapala Fillet Knife in jagged strokes, the nerve endings in the sea monsters face all fired off, causing the head to shake in my hand like something out of a horror movie.

Each cheek weighed about a pound and a quarter, but my inexperience with a fillet knife probably left a quarter pound of meat in each cheek.

Still, it was the most epic thing I’d ever experienced, and I longed for a chance to catch one.

***

The next day was uneventful by comparison, but I did manage to catch a Lingcod. I’d thought I was snagging the bottom too frequently, but I soon realized at least a few were fish, so I tried fighting them. On light trout tackle with eight-pound mono, it was an uphill battle (literally), but I managed to get it to the surface, where, after several attempts, my friend Christopher netted it.

The minimum length was 24 inches back then, and, you guessed it, it was 23 1/4″ long. I was forced to release my first sea monster, but I’d added a new species and set a lifelong quest in motion: catch a sea monster the size of Mr. Fields’ someday.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #12 — Pumpkinseed or read more about this unique, life-changing trip here: The Second Lesson: Fish of a Lifetime.


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