Species #156 — Gulf Kingfish

There were some specific reasons I arrived at this being an Atlantic Kingfish as opposed to a Gulf Kingfish, but I can’t remember them now. I do remember the Hardhead Catfish I caught shortly after this fish that impaled my finger, made me fall backwards and slice my foot on a rock, though.Species: Gulf Kingfish (Menticirrhus littoralis)
Location: Saint Petersburg, Florida
Date: July 14, 2018

After spending most of the day fishing at two separate piers and finding plenty of fish but little in the way of species variety, I opted to move to the outer edges of Tampa Bay.

I found myself not far from Saint Petersburg fishing an inlet where tides carved the sand relatively deep as it narrowed between a rocky point and a concrete causeway.

At this point in the trip, I was tired, sunburned, and sore, so I admittedly wasn’t at the top of my game.

I was lazy and just tossed out a truncated Sabiki rig with cocktail shrimp that was almost not at the top of its game. With a light weight, I’d cast out as far as I could and then slowly reel in line, drifting the bait like you might do for salmon or steelhead.

It was slow-going, but I finally landed this kingfish, making 25 species on my first trip to Florida. Not bad for a guy still relatively new to the Species Hunting game who hadn’t even set up his own Fishing Map yet. If you can relate, learn How to Build Your Fishing Map, so you can be more prepared moving forward.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #157 — Round Goby.

Species #155 — Black Sea Bass

This photo doesn’t do it justice. These fish are flat beautiful for a fish with no color.

Species: Black Sea Bass (Centropristis striata)
Location: Tampa, Florida
Date: July 13, 2018

Perhaps the biggest surprise of my first “real” Florida trip was this Black Sea Bass. Note: my actual first trip to Florida was a single night fishing in Pensacola the summer before, but this was an extended stay. The Black Sea Bass took a piece of shrimp on a Sabiki rig, and I was shocked. I had no idea these fish made it as far south as Central Florida.

Though it wasn’t the rich blue-black with white tubercules I’d seen in pictures, it was still a Black Sea Bass, and I was up to 24 species on this trip. Not bad.

I released it after a quick pic and moved on to the final fish of my Florida trip.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #156 — Atlantic Kingfish.

Species #154 — Scrawled Cowfish

It’s like a tiny child tried to draw, well scrawl, the face of a wildebeest onto a tube of toothpaste that was partially squeezed out but not before throwing some fins on it.

Species: Scrawled Cowfish (Acanthostracion quadricornis)
Location: Tampa, Florida
Date: July 13, 2018

After adding a species early on shrimp, I got another one to take a bit of squid, and it was something out of science fiction.

Something with “quadricorn” in its Latin name is bound to be strange, but the Scrawled Cowfish is probably the weirdest fish I’ve caught to-date.

A few things you should know about the Scrawled Cowfish:

1) Its fins all rotate independently of one another. It’s off-putting.

2) Its skin feels like wet leather.

3) For the first time, “What that mouth do?” is a sincere question and not just a sexually-explicit phrase from pop culture. I seriously wonder how it works.

4) The black marbles that are its eyes reflect back your darkest secrets.

5) It has two rear-facing spines near its anal vent which seem to serve as natural, built-in protection from randy dolphins.

Watch the video.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #155 — Black Sea Bass.

Species #153 — Spottail Pinfish

Spottail Pinfish are pretty distinctive. They don’t really resemble Pinfish, and they have an unmistakable spot on the caudal peduncle.

Species: Spottail Pinfish (Diplodus holbrookii)
Location: Tampa, Florida
Date: July 13, 2018

I first “met” Ryan Crutchfield on Instagram before I’d even started species hunting. Our social circles overlapped, and I found myself following a guy on Instagram who posted some out of the ordinary fish pictures.

Sure, the tarpon, snook, redfish, and bass pics I expected from a Florida-based account were awesome, but so were the fish he posted that I wasn’t as familiar with.

Little did I know at the time, but he was the founder of fishmap.org, an awesome website sponsored by the North American Native Fishes Association (NANFA) aimed at mapping out fish distributions graphically by pulling from multiple sources.

If you haven’t checked out FishMap.org yet, you should make like a 90s song and jump on it.

 

FishMap is sort of like the USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species List but draws on a more comprehensive data set that includes anglers and armchair naturalists.

***

Knowing Ryan was nearby, I had to fish with him. After all, he’d provided me with several locations that panned out in Orlando.

Besides, after fishing Orlando hard for a week, I moved over to Tampa to try and notch some saltwater species. I mean, it was Florida, after all.

I spent the first night alone, but that’s the norm. Coincidentally, I also fished alone that first night, landing one new species in the White Grunt, as well as a number of unsolicited Hardhead Catfish.

But apart from seeing other people catch small sharks — why can I never catch sharks? — it was sort of a misadventure in the dark.

Misadventure in the Dark sounds like the title of your sex tape. Sorry. That was inappropriate, but I’m just happy Brooklyn Nine-Nine got renewed for a seventh season, and the signature catchphrase is arguably better than “That’s what she said.”

***

Regardless, Ryan agreed to meet me mid-morning to do some fishing with a window of free time he had.

Between his bait and mine, we had shrimp, squid, and half a dozen artificials. The cocktail assortment of bait proved to be the ticket, and we quickly started catching fish.

The new species came almost immediately: a Spottail Pinfish. It was going to be a good morning; I could feel it.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #154 — Scrawled Cowfish.

Species #152 — White Grunt

I wet the sand before putting the fish down, so at least I made an attempt to be better.

Species: White Grunt (Haemulon plumierii)
Location: Tampa, Florida
Date: July 13, 2018

I spent two solid days at ICAST with Fishbrain. From meeting Roland Martin and April Vokey to sitting next to Scott Martin during breakfast, I couldn’t have been happier. It as about as much fun as you can have while not fishing.

You can read about there here.

Nonetheless, spending two whole days in Florida without catching a new species was killing me. Sure, it was awesome to get so much face time with my heroes and introduce a few new friends to microfishing, species hunting, even watch some nice Florida bass caught on the fly, I was itching for something new.

***

I arrived in Tampa late, and by the time I made it to my first stop, it was dark.

As I walked up, I saw a small shark caught and was optimistic.

Alas, all I would catch that night were the ever-present Hardhead Catfish and a single new species, the White Grunt.

This White Grunt is a fish and not to be confused with the sound Caucasian men make when espousing manliness during a football game or at a barbecue.

It was no shark, but it was a new species, and it was welcomed.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #153 — Spottail Pinfish.

Species #147 — Atlantic Spadefish

I put this fish on warm pavement, and I feel like a POS for doing that, but every one of the dozens I’ve caught since was treated respectfully. Atlantic Spadefish are some of my favorite saltwater fish.

Species: Atlantic Spadefish (Chaetodipterus faber)
Location: Titusville, Florida
Date: July 8, 2018

Every time a fish bites a baited hook, the reality is that they may be digging their own grave. I have no qualms with keeping fish, especially since seafood is my favorite.

When given the opportunity to catch plentiful, good-eating fish, I’ve been known to shovel them into a bucket, take them home, and host a fish fry.

The Atlantic Spadefish is no different.

At least, it would be no different were it located in a place where I had access to cooking facilities. Since I didn’t on my first trip to Florida, I released every fish I caught — even those barely big enough to handle.

I named my first Atlantic Spadefish Doug and the second one Phil, and since you can’t eat fish you’ve named, they both swam free.

Spadefish are incredible fighters as a hole, and if you are lucky enough to tie into them on light tackle, consider yourself lucky.

I hooked into my on small bits of shrimp, but I’ve since caught them on shrimp, squid, bits of fish, artificial baits, and sabikis. They’re not even that slimy, so you won’t need your trusty hand trowel to wipe off afterwards.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #148 — Longnose Gar.

Species #145 — Common Snook

It’s easy to see why these fish are so popular. Why wouldn’t you love giant, saltwater bass?

Species: Common Snook (Centropomus undecimalis)
Location: Titusville, Florida
Date: July 9, 2018

It wasn’t a tarpon. It wasn’t a Ladyfish, either.

It was something lighter in color with a big mouth.

It was a snook.

Snook are awesome. For years, they’ve been near the top of my target list, but they always seemed so unrealistic. Every video I’d seen involved a guy on an expensive boat very obviously out of my price range.

I figured I’d get one eventually, but when I cast my Rapala between two mangrove gnarls on the way back to the car, haggard from a morning of failed tarpon hookups, I was pleasantly surprised by a spunky little snook.

It jumped my Rapala at the bank, crushing it against the shore and providing a nice little change of pace for the repeated disappointment I’d been boiling in all morning.

Mine was only 20-some inches long, and give where I hooked it, the photo-ops were limited, but I managed to snap a quick #SpeciesQuest photo and let it go to let it grow.

Besides, it was a small consolation for the all of the tarpon I’d lost that day, and if

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #146 — Atlantic Tarpon.

Species #146 — Atlantic Tarpon

Crazy how Florida’s top prize is silver and not gold.

Species: Atlantic Tarpon (Megalops atlanticus)
Location: Titusville, Florida
Date: July 8, 2018

I already wrote this one. You can find it below.

Ask any angler for a list of their 10 dream species, and Atlantic Tarpon will be on it.

Megalops atlanticus entered my dream species list the moment I first watched these silver slabs of muscle erupt from the water with enough headshake to cause whiplash, testing the anglers battling it to the very limits of their skill and hoping for a healthy dose of luck, to-boot.

Yes, tarpon were long a dream of mine.

The funny thing about dreams is how you react when they pass within striking distance.

I was in Florida this summer, and tarpon were just a few hours away. I had a rental car, and I had time to chase them, so I began looking into guided tarpon trips. This was really happening, and I was numb. Was I really about to catch a tarpon?

My dreams were crushed as quickly as they were revitalized. The least-expensive trips I could find were $400 for the day, and with a summer full of travel and fishing planned, I couldn’t afford to drop so much on a single day of fishing — not even for a dream species.

It seemed as though tarpon would remain just a dream.

Connections

As I was scrolling through my Instagram feed, dejected, I noticed a post from a trio of guys I’d gotten in contact with during my time in Orlando.

Pierce Sanders, Zain Khalid and Jessel Sanchez were a trio of friends who live to fish as much as I do. They’d put me on to a lot of fish, and I just happened to see a post featuring one of them fishing for juvenile tarpon on light tackle.

Sitting at the restaurant that night, I distinctly remember the food falling out of my mouth as I came to the realization that they’d done this from shore with bass gear. Then I realized that they might be willing to share their spot.

Lastly, I realized the woman at the table next to me was staring with a look of disgust.

I smiled. Not at her, but with anticipation.

My dream was alive once again.

Hell

It was a blur after that. The next day, I found myself in a car, driving up the Space Coast and into a salt marsh full of brackish canals, dirt roads and the rich promise of a tarpon.

The wet heat smothered me like a blanket the moment I stepped out of my car, causing me to gasp as mosquitoes began feasting almost immediately. The sun raged downward, and I wondered what I was getting myself into.

Filling my bag with tackle, a bottle of water and some bug spray, I began the long, surprisingly moist walk to the spot they’d recommended.

This place was unreal. I arrived to find several manatees just 2 feet away from a drainage pipe, apparently appreciating the flowing water in the summer heat. When the novelty wore off, I realized they were blocking me from fishing that side of the canal, so I begrudgingly switched sides.

Manatees are so cool.

Despite the heat, I found myself hopping spots frequently and trying a little of everything. I threw bait, spoons, swimbaits, jigs, spinners and even topwater, but nothing enticed the tarpon I knew had to be lurking beneath the churning cola-colored water.

Then, I tried a Rapala.

Almost immediately, I hooked a Ladyfish, a species related to the tarpon but much, much less glamorous.

I caught half a dozen Ladyfish before the gators got interested and moved closer to me. This was unnerving, but they were in the water, and I was on land, nestled between thick mangroves and standing above a number of drainage pipes. There was no room to maneuver, casting was a struggle and if I were to hook a big fish, I’d have a two-foot space to land one in. Still, the compact space made me feel safe from the gators.

Eruption

When the first tarpon hit, my heart skipped a beat. Imagine fishing with a trout rod when a four-foot silver blur erupts on your lure from less than a rod’s length away. But wait. Imagine it hitting so hard and fast that it comes three feet out of the water when hooked. As you react and try to fight it, it jumps again, this time five feet out of the water and straight into a mangrove growing right next to you, thrashing as you try to grab the flailing 15- or 20-pound fish at eye level.

Five seconds have now elapsed, and you watch helplessly as the fish flails and flops just out of reach while a gator moves even closer in hopes of a free meal.

Then the hook comes free, the tarpon hits the water and you’re left reeling in more ways than one.

Repeat this a dozen times, with some variation taking place every time. Sometimes the fish jumps five or six times. Sometimes it runs and stops. Sometimes you’re so surprising you flinch like you’ve been hit in the face.

Every time, you lose the fish.

It wasn’t a dream, it was a nightmare.

I steadily landed Ladyfish in between tarpon hookups, but after this tarpon scenario repeated more times than I could believe, my dehydration became real. It was over 100 degrees out with more than 100 percent humidity, and I’d finished my water hours ago. Soaked with sweat, I made the trek back to the car for more water, stopping only to throw a few casts and catch a small Common Snook right up against the mangroves.

Home stretch

After returning with water, I no longer feared keeling over from dehydration, but I was terrified of not landing one of these tarpon. Fortunately, I only hooked and lost two before one finally stayed pinned. I carefully pulled it up into my tiny landing window on the shore and lipped it. It didn’t love being lipped, and it let me know by shredding my thumb with it’s sandpapery mouth.

On a scale of 1 to Awesome, tarpon stands very near the top.

I grabbed a few quick pictures to commemorate my dream and let it go.

I’d hooked 15 tarpon and landed just one, but that one, 2-foot fish was enough to make that dream a reality.

Of course my only tarpon came when nobody was around to take a picture of it…

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #147 — Atlantic Spadefish.

Species #144 — Ladyfish

I couldn’t keep the Ladyfish away from me. Though I wanted a tarpon, trying to fight off the Ladies was nothing new, so I managed.

Species: Ladyfish (Elops saurus)
Location: Titusville, Florida
Date: July 9, 2018

Though Ladyfish can grow quite large, none of the 20 or so I caught while chasing tarpon were. I did manage to hook into one pushing 30 inches in length, but it spit the hook almost immediately.

I was fishing a stretch of Florida brackish swamp that was insanely hot, full of mosquitoes, riddled with gators, and had I not lost half a dozen tarpon early in the trip, I would’ve admitted defeat.

The Ladyfish pictured became bait, but even that couldn’t get a tarpon in hand.

After hours of sweating all available water weight, I was beginning to think that I was wasting my time. Then, on a whim, I cast out and caught something that wasn’t a Ladyfish…

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #145 — Common Snook.

Species #129 — Smoothhead Sculpin

I had this down as a Scalyhead Sculpin at first, but after consulting with an expert, it shifted to another member of the genus: Smoothhead Sculpin. Note my reflection in the corner. #Swag.

Species: Smoothhead Sculpin (Artedius lateralis)
Location: Oregon Coast
Date: June 20, 2018

Freshwater sculpins, especially the Cottus species, are among the most difficult-to-identify fish around.

Marine sculpins aren’t quite as tough, especially with the odd Rosylip Sculpin or Buffalo Sculpin kicking around, but there are a lot of them with blurred edges. One such fish is the Smoothead Sculpin. There are three fish in this genus (Padded, Smoothhead, and Scalyhead), and they’re insanely difficult to tell apart. Strangely, the Scalyhead Sculpin is supposed to be the most common but is the only one I’ve never caught.

Honestly, I don’t even really remember how he distinguished the two, but since I’ve only caught one more in that genus (another Smoothhead) since, it hasn’t been an issue.

Lazy? Sure.

But at least I know my flaws and don’t try to *smooth* over them.

In all seriousness, I used Coastal Fish Identification: California to Alaska and the Mola Marine PNW Sculpins 3.0 supplement to help me identify them. It turns out 9-out-of-10 dentists recommend cutting your teeth on both if you’re a Lifelister in the PNW.

***

One thing that is noticeable about these particular sculpins is their massive heads, especially compared to their tidepool peers.

Look at that thing! Its head is huge.

The latest Smoothhead had me thinking it was a different, and it was. Because it was another Padded Sculpin.

I’ll get my Scalyhead eventually, though, so I’m not worried.

#SpeciesQuest // #CaughtOvgard

Read the next entry in #SpeciesQuest here: Species #130 — Mountain Whitefish.